Eliot Cardinaux

Pianist/Poet/Composer/Improviser

New Book: Nativity – OUT NOW on The Bodily Press

Eliot Cardinaux’s newest collection, Nativity, now out on The Bodily Press, is a 4 part sequence exploring the symbols, images, and phenomena of the present age. It includes an exhibition of highly triggered, symbolic imagist poems, entitled “Guests;” an essay outlining the author’s “Theses on the Philosophy of Rarity” in the digital age; a short selection of personal dedications in verse, titled “Sentiments;” and a long-form, fragmentary poetics, also in verse, entitled “is the soft boy ready.”

‘I’m thinking of an inverse poetry, which turns experience outward like a flower, raises up without empathy, and echoes the reader, without ensnaring; its collection would be, like their trace upon a winter city, a ghost town for friends.’
-Eliot Cardinaux, from the introduction to Nativity

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Cover from Nativity

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The Bodily Press

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Official Press Launch
Triple Book Release & Reading
Sat. Feb. 4th, 7:00PM
@ Goodrich House
36 Goodrich Rd.
Jamaica Plain

Dear Friends,

As most of you know, I’ve been publishing small books of poetry on my own for about 4 years now; never digitally, but let’s face it – it gets lonely out there for a guy and a computer, and for a while I’ve wanted to start printing books for other people. Rare bits of music released on tape as well, go hand in hand with that, I guess. So today, The Bodily Press awakens, kneeling; and scratches its head at the altar of technology, at last. Read the rest of this entry »

Theses on the Philosophy of Rarity

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In the present age, visual and aural senses are the only used to absorb those works of art that are digitally reproduced and distributed. In the case of other senses, we rely on synesthesia as it correlates with these differing modes of expression. In a museum, one is rarely allowed to touch a work of art; as Benjamin states, one may simply stand near it, amidst its “aura.” Read the rest of this entry »

Levering Memory (Notes on the Inner Life of Piano)

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In 2016 I was living in Boston after graduating from New England Conservatory. The world I believed I belonged to was like American English, in that it only accounted for that within earshot, and although I listened, I could never hear the sound of bells that rang outside its walls – that which was too far to hear unless there was a breeze. Hence, I felt guarded against all that was in my periphery. And so I naturally knew to become just that: the sidelong glance of a thief, a strand of poetry abandoned by a world leader after it became too much to wrestle with.  Read the rest of this entry »

AMERICAN THICKET – OUT NOW on Loyal Label

Photo by Michelle Arcila Opsvik

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RE-EMERGING PIANIST, POET AND COMPOSER ELIOT CARDINAUX OFFERS UP AMERICAN THICKET, HIS DEBUT ALBUM AS A LEADER ON LOYAL LABEL, A HAUNTING RIFLE THROUGH THE UNDERGROWTH OF AMERICAN RURAL CULTURE IN TENSILE IMPROVISATIONS AND VERSE

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Music and the Mechanics of a Beloved Creature

Existential answers, like the answers provided by some religions, are a means by which we attempt to find comfort in the present moment. A good example would be this: if someone is going through a rough time, and consequently finds out that others around him are also going through a rough time, that person might find an answer in astrology: say, “Mercury is in retrograde.” The flip side of this answer might be that Read the rest of this entry »

Excerpts from “The Gown of Entry”

The Fit of God

These are from The Gown of Entry, a short collection of prose poems I am working on currently. Feels nice to break into a new way of dealing with language. Because of the prose, some say Read the rest of this entry »

Ways to Mouth

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Ways to word

 

These are part of an ongoing series of writings in which I’m beginning to document my poetic process. These are not meant as a manual for writing, although they indeed intend to spark conversation and thought surrounding the process of writing for many other people beside myself. There is no one way to write, and therefore any convictions I gain throughout this process will remain my own, except if they are transliterated by others into their own ways to mouth. I use the word transliteration, which means Read the rest of this entry »

“Bark” (tangential learning in poetic scores)

Bark Score (jpeg)

Note: My reference to “tangential learning” was influenced most deeply by a factor of my childhood, i.e. learning to adapt to my own very active, associative imagination (labeled Attention Deficit Disorder by my superiors from quite a young age). I thought it was interesting how a part of my process of [musical] composition came about Read the rest of this entry »

Blackbirds

Blackbird VI

Recently, a teacher of mine (Tanya Kalmanovitch of the New England Conservatory) offered an assignment to “set” to music 2 or 3 poems or stanzas from the famous “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird” by a poet named Wallace Stevens. Since, in the spirit of writers like Stevens, there is no one way of looking at a blackbird, I decided to offer musicians a chance to take what was given in the score and adapt it to whichever way they sought to see it, up to a point. Read the rest of this entry »